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The Sugar – Insulin Connection to Dyslipidemia and Cardiovascular Disease
July 25th, 2012 by Dennis McInerney

I have always been a believer that excess dietary sugar was the underlying cause of dyslipidemia and heart disease and not dietary fat as claimed by the American Heart Association (AHA). A study published in JAMA, April 21, 2010—Vol 303, No. 15 titled “Caloric Sweetener Consumption and Dyslipidemia Among US Adults” validates my belief. This study assessed the association between consumption of added sugars and blood lipid levels in US adults. It was a cross-sectional study among US adults (n=6113) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2006. The participants were grouped by intake of added sugars as a percentage of total calories.
 
        •     Less than 5% of total calories [reference group]
        •     5% – less than 10% of total calories
        •     10% – less than 17.5% of total calories
        •     17.5% – less than 25% of total calories
        •     ≥25% of total calories
 
The study results showed a linear trend decrease in HDL-Cholesterol, increase in LDL-Cholesterol and increase in triglycerides as added sugars increased as a percentage of total calories. The study concluded that “there was a statistically significant correlation between dietary added sugars and blood lipid levels among US adults.”

 
The logical solution is to address the excess sugar issue. Keeping added dietary sugar to less than 5% of total calories is a starting point. While cleaning up the diet, nutritional supplements can be used to support the transition and minimize the effect of insulin resistance on cholesterol production. A small study done in 2002 by David Brownstein, MD illustrates the benefit nutritional support can have on the lipid profile of patients with insulin resistance. There were 20 participants in Dr. Brownstein’s study and each received 2 capsules of GlucoBalance® and 2 capsules of Flax Seed Oil three times per day for 30 days. Pre and post study lipid profile tests were done on each patient. The average pre-study triglycerides were 262 and the average post-study triglycerides were 192. The total cholesterol to HDL ratio improved by 11.5%.
 
There are other Biotics Research products that support and minimize the effects of insulin resistance on cholesterol production. They include the Sirt products developed by Biotics Research in conjunction with Mark Houston, MD, MSc, SCH, ABAAM, FACP, FAHA. EHA-Sirt Supreme®, Lipid-Sirt®, VasculoSirt® and ResveraSirt-HP® all support vascular integrity and healthy aging by supporting and stimulating sirtuin activity.
 
Shift happens, but when it comes to the understanding the detrimental effects of excess sugar in the American diet, it’s been a slow process particularly for the American medical profession.


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