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Reducing Your Daily Toxic Load
Jul 17th, 2014 by Dennis McInerney

The holidays are over and many, health conscious Americans have already begun or are thinking about a bio-detoxification program to start off the New Year. If you haven’t already started a detox program, consider the “Easy 3 – Step Bio-Detoxification program from Biotics Research. It will cleanse your body from head-to-toe leaving you energized and revitalized.

Once the detox program is completed, then what? For many, that’s the end? They begin the cycle all over again and wait till next January to rid themselves of a year’s worth of toxins? It just wasn’t the holiday diet and lifestyle excesses that made them feel the need to detox. We live in a “Toxic World”. Our bodies accumulate toxins every day. The holiday excess was just “the straw that broke the Camel’s back”, so to speak. With that thought in mind, I want to share some ideas on how to reduce our daily toxic load and assure adequate nutrients are available to support the body’s detox pathways.

One way to reduce our daily toxic load is by becoming more aware of, and avoiding common toxins found in food, beverages and the environment.

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Managing the Toxic Effects of Acetaldehyde
Jul 8th, 2014 by Dennis McInerney

Acetaldehyde is a common and potent neurotoxin. Acetaldehyde is ubiquitous in the ambient environment. It is formed as a product of incomplete wood combustion in fireplaces and woodstoves, coffee roasting, burning of tobacco, vehicle exhaust fumes, and coal refining. Many individuals are exposed to acetaldehyde by simply breathing ambient air. Other environmental sources of acetaldehyde include room air deodorizers, cologne’s and perfumes1. Inhalation of air containing elevated levels of acetaldehyde can cause respiratory tract irritation, central nervous system depression and possibly pulmonary edema. Very high concentrations can cause dizziness, respiratory depression, convulsions or even death2.

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If you’re suffering from chronic allergies, you might want to consider a bio-detoxification program
Nov 5th, 2012 by Dennis McInerney

Since June of 2004, I have made it a practice to do a detox program at least twice a year. One of the most positive side effects of detoxing I have experienced was that my chronic allergic reactions to airborne pollen, environment chemicals and mold, and certain foods would greatly subside or be completely eliminated within a week of starting my detox. So what is the link between detoxing and allergies?

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The Diet Connection to Anxiety, Depression and other Neurological Disorders
Oct 31st, 2012 by Dennis McInerney

Despite the number of neurotropic drugs introduce over the past three decades, there has been an astonishing increase in neurological disorders in the United States. An article in “Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry”, Volume 7, Number 1, Spring, 2005, written by Robert Whitaker, states that “The number of Americans disabled by mental illness has nearly doubled since 1987, when Prozac-the first in a second generation of wonder drugs for mental illness-was introduced.” Mr. Whitaker also documents that in placebo controlled studies involving anxiety, depression and other neurological disorders, relapse was significantly higher in the pharmacotherapy groups as compared to those taking a placebo.

Maybe it’s time for a paradigm shift in the way we address anxiety, depression and other neurological disorders. A number of published studies have looked at the connection between diet and mood, as well as, how the availability of neurotransmitter precursors and other metabolic co-factor impact the synthesis of neurotransmitters.

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Can We Prevent Parkinson’s Disease With N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids?
Sep 30th, 2012 by Dennis McInerney

Frédéric Calon; Francesca Cicchetti, Phd
 
Abstract
 
It is increasingly clear that nongenetic elements play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), yet no modifiable environmental risk factor has been clearly identified. Recent work in animal models of PD supports the contention that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) found in fatty fish are neuroprotective in PD. Moreover, a few epidemiological reports suggest that a high intake of fish (and n-3 PUFA) is associated with a lower risk of developing PD. The question remains whether docosahexenoic or eicosapentenoic acid is the brain n-3 PUFA responsible for the observed neuroprotective effect. Despite these encouraging data, the development of n-3 PUFA as drugs is hindered by the fact that they are nonpatentable compounds, at least in their natural form. Nevertheless, owing to their favorable safety profile, it should be a high priority to pursue preclinical and clinical studies on the nutraceutical properties of n-3 PUFA in PD.
What Happened to Our Food?
Sep 9th, 2012 by Dennis McInerney

Please view this powerful 18 minute video by Robin O'Brien.  It will forever change your thinking about food and the food choices you make.
 
 

The Sugar – Insulin Connection to Dyslipidemia and Cardiovascular Disease
Jul 25th, 2012 by Dennis McInerney

I have always been a believer that excess dietary sugar was the underlying cause of dyslipidemia and heart disease and not dietary fat as claimed by the American Heart Association (AHA). A study published in JAMA, April 21, 2010—Vol 303, No. 15 titled “Caloric Sweetener Consumption and Dyslipidemia Among US Adults” validates my belief. This study assessed the association between consumption of added sugars and blood lipid levels in US adults. It was a cross-sectional study among US adults (n=6113) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2006. The participants were grouped by intake of added sugars as a percentage of total calories.
 
        •     Less than 5% of total calories [reference group]
        •     5% – less than 10% of total calories
        •     10% – less than 17.5% of total calories
        •     17.5% – less than 25% of total calories
        •     ≥25% of total calories
 
The study results showed a linear trend decrease in HDL-Cholesterol, increase in LDL-Cholesterol and increase in triglycerides as added sugars increased as a percentage of total calories. The study concluded that “there was a statistically significant correlation between dietary added sugars and blood lipid levels among US adults.”

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Do You Have A Nutritional Deficit?
Jul 5th, 2012 by Dennis McInerney

Nutritional Wellbeing is a matter of Supply and Demand.

For many individual, nutritional demand has become greater than the diminished supply of  essential nutrients we get from our diet. The quantity and quality of the nutrients we get from our food is determined by the soil it is grown in, the processing it goes through and the emotional desire we have for a given food. Today, the soils in which we grow our fruits and vegetables are depleted of many essential minerals.  We consume more and more processed foods that are lacking in the nutrients they once had.  And we make food choices that tend toward fast and convenient foods which often provide empty calories high in fat and concentrated carbohydrates.

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A Common Sense Approach to Weight Management
Jan 21st, 2012 by Dennis McInerney

Weight management has been and continues to be a never ending challenge for many Americans. This is evidenced by the fact that 66% of adult Americans are overweight with 31% percent being obese (1). In addition, childhood obesity in the United States has more than tripled in the past two decades. The three big contributors to weight gain are the excess consumption sugar, processed food and fast food. Prior to 1900, the average amount of sugar consumed by Americans was 5 pounds per person per year (2). By 1997, the average amount of sugar consumption rose to 154 pounds per person per year and continues to grow (3). Our busy lives find us seeking quick meals in the form of processed food and fast food. Couple this with chronic stress and a sedentary lifestyle and you have a recipe for obesity. Chronic diseases such as insulin resistance, Type II Diabetes and heart disease can be directly linked to obesity. Approximately 25 million Americans have Type II Diabetes and 100 million people are estimated to be insulin resistant. Obesity is truly an American epidemic .

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3 Roadblocks to Weight Loss
Jan 2nd, 2012 by Dennis McInerney

Click Read the rest of this entry below to listen to an audio presentation on the 3 Roadblocks to Weight Loss, presented by Krislyn Ann and Dr. Robert Maki.

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